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Four tips for adapting to the “new” Mass

We’re going on a field trip again today, over to the Huffington Post. Do you have your signed slip permission slip? I’m over there trying to help people adapt to the new language of the Mass. I’ll start you here and link you there:

By Mary DeTurris Poust
Having come of age in the years after Vatican II, I never knew the Catholic Mass in Latin. In fact, the only version I know is the one that’s been celebrated for the past 40 years. So I didn’t take too kindly to the idea that the words and responses of the Mass would be changing, and I’d have to look at a written guide to get me through the prayers that have rolled off my tongue since childhood.

The impending changes to the English translation of the universal Roman Missal have sparked controversy among Catholics, to be sure. Some wonder why we need a new translation when the old one seemed to be working just fine. They see the new language–which brings the English more closely in line with the original Latin–as a return to a harsher time, a past that no longer fits our modern way of thinking. Others see the changes as a long time coming, a correction of a translation that was always slightly “off.” Whatever side of the fence you’re on, the changes are less than one month away. It’s time to adapt and move forward. The new translation of the Roman Missal will go into effect on the first Sunday of Advent, November 27, which is the beginning of the Church year for Catholics.

So what will these changes mean for you? They will probably feel somewhat strange at first, and no doubt there will be some things that may never feel right. I’m not going to try to convince anyone that referring to Jesus as “consubstantial with the Father” in the Nicene Creed where we once had the almost-lilting “one in being with the Father” is ever going to feel normal, let alone be an improvement. But, if we approach the changes with an open mind and, more importantly, an open heart, we just might find our connection to the Mass reinvigorated for the first time in years, something Catholics in this country could sorely use.

Here are four basic guidelines for making the new Mass your own:

Get to know the Scriptural references behind some of the changes. When I first heard that the short prayer said before Communion was changing, I balked. Continue reading HERE.

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2 Comments Post a comment
  1. Anonymous #

    “We sit when we are listening, learning or meditating, just as Jesus’ followers sat around him when he preached.”

    Actually, the posture at the time of Jesus was that the teacher was the one who sat while the disciples / students stood around the person teaching and listened.

    November 4, 2011
  2. @Anonymous

    Mark 3:31-34. ‘Nuff said.

    November 4, 2011

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